Tyres

Eeyore

Forum GOD!
To that end and for the type of driving I do, I have no quarms running Chinese rubber. Currently Joyride..
Previous to this Avon and Uniroyal were the choice on my Golf GTI
The thing with tyres is that they should not only be fit for 99,99% of your kms but also for the remaining 0,01%. In the very distant past, I had Chinese tyres on my motorbike. Decent enough for most weather conditions but outright dangerous in cold and wet weather. I stick to the well known and recommended brands.
 

MntnMan62

Forum GOD!
Americans’ expectation of tyre /tire life is SO different to Europeans’.
What should my expectations be? The manufacturer says they will last 70,000 miles. It was a factor in my decision to purchase them. I would accept seeing 55,000 or 60,000 miles at the worst. But 45,000? I don’t drive on a track. I don’t street race. I think Continental is committing corporate theft. And if I were to file a claim they would reject that claim for not rotating my tires every 5,000 miles. I rotate them every 10,000 which I feel is plenty. My expectation is that I should see an amount of mileage that at least approximates the manufacturer’s own suggested mileage. Where do I have this wrong?
 

p.b

Forum GOD!
What should my expectations be? The manufacturer says they will last 70,000 miles. It was a factor in my decision to purchase them. I would accept seeing 55,000 or 60,000 miles at the worst. But 45,000? I don’t drive on a track. I don’t street race. I think Continental is committing corporate theft. And if I were to file a claim they would reject that claim for not rotating my tires every 5,000 miles. I rotate them every 10,000 which I feel is plenty. My expectation is that I should see an amount of mileage that at least approximates the manufacturer’s own suggested mileage. Where do I have this wrong?
Nothing wrong with your expectations.

North Americans regularly expect their tires to last around 70k miles. Europeans are generally happy with ~25k miles from their tyres. Probably a consequence of the greater distances traveled in North America and so tyre compounds have been developed to deliver those durability expectations. I was simply commenting on the differences in our expectations - I don't think I've ever had a set of tyres last more than 20k miles, even when rotating them.

I assume that if you take the effort to rotate tyres you also make the effort to have the toe settings correct and pressures set, otherwise that would affect wear.

I think the Conti tyres could last 70k on a lighter vehicle or on a vehicle with 'kinder' geometry. I suspect that Audi set up their US suspension to deliver a sporty response, and that could mean that the wheels have more aggressive camber /toe / caster angles which will generate a lot more tyre wear than a more neutral set-up with more benign handling. Also if your's is AWD then that will also increase tyre wear. This is also a massive generalization but if you buy a German car you're buying into 'German engineering' and there are two ways to engineer a car: the German way and the wrong way (this is why it took years for BMW to put cupholders in their vehicles because cars are for driving not picnicking in) and tyre wear will not be a high priority for Audi vs. ride / handling / steering optimisation and that is the German way (i.e. the right way). In summary, I'm sure the Conti tyres could do 70k miles, but probably not on an Audi A6.
 

RandySp

Forum GOD!
What should my expectations be? The manufacturer says they will last 70,000 miles. It was a factor in my decision to purchase them. I would accept seeing 55,000 or 60,000 miles at the worst. But 45,000? I don’t drive on a track. I don’t street race. I think Continental is committing corporate theft. And if I were to file a claim they would reject that claim for not rotating my tires every 5,000 miles. I rotate them every 10,000 which I feel is plenty. My expectation is that I should see an amount of mileage that at least approximates the manufacturer’s own suggested mileage. Where do I have this wrong?
You re right. My first tyres were new Continental Premium Contact 2, brand new then, the car (206, 1400cc, 90hp,16v) was moving in town with some kilometres in the national road, no spinning, no Grand Theft Auto, no sudden brakes, no handbrakes(tale to head).

The kilometres they last? 40000km and they were bald like Yul Brynner. I couldn't believe it.

From that time, I didn't bother using Continental, overpriced, with no slickness, cushion, glid... Oops sorry! Wrong thread...!
 

MntnMan62

Forum GOD!
Nothing wrong with your expectations.

North Americans regularly expect their tires to last around 70k miles. Europeans are generally happy with ~25k miles from their tyres. Probably a consequence of the greater distances traveled in North America and so tyre compounds have been developed to deliver those durability expectations. I was simply commenting on the differences in our expectations - I don't think I've ever had a set of tyres last more than 20k miles, even when rotating them.

I assume that if you take the effort to rotate tyres you also make the effort to have the toe settings correct and pressures set, otherwise that would affect wear.

I think the Conti tyres could last 70k on a lighter vehicle or on a vehicle with 'kinder' geometry. I suspect that Audi set up their US suspension to deliver a sporty response, and that could mean that the wheels have more aggressive camber /toe / caster angles which will generate a lot more tyre wear than a more neutral set-up with more benign handling. Also if your's is AWD then that will also increase tyre wear. This is also a massive generalization but if you buy a German car you're buying into 'German engineering' and there are two ways to engineer a car: the German way and the wrong way (this is why it took years for BMW to put cupholders in their vehicles because cars are for driving not picnicking in) and tyre wear will not be a high priority for Audi vs. ride / handling / steering optimisation and that is the German way (i.e. the right way). In summary, I'm sure the Conti tyres could do 70k miles, but probably not on an Audi A6.
I don't agree with this statement. There are all sorts of ratings available in the market. There are tires that are rated for 40,000 miles. There are tires that are rated for 70,000 miles. And everything in between. If I had bought a tire with a 40,000 mile rating, I wouldn't expect it to last 70,000 miles. I'll agree that a German car with AWD driven a little more "energetically" can reduce tire wear. But by how much? Let's face it. I bought an Audi A6 with a turbo charged 6 cylinder that produces 310 hp because I like the smile it puts on my face when I press my foot on the accelerator. I like the smile it puts on my face when I wind along at 60 mph on desolate mountain roads. I wasn't actually expecting to see 70,000 miles. But I was expecting more than 45,000 miles. In the end, I'll accept it and deal with it. I definitely agree with your final statement 100%.
 

p.b

Forum GOD!
I'll agree that a German car with AWD driven a little more "energetically" can reduce tire wear. But by how much?
I would expect less than half the tyre wear than my father would get in the same car, with the same tyres.

Also Audi's have heavy front axles which will also crucify tyre wear.
 

Burgundy

Forum GOD!
Any opinions on all-season tyres? i.e. Michelin CrossClimate+, Continental AllSeasonContact.

The tyres on the Fiat 500 need changing and I’m not sure I want to replace with the cheapest the garage will fit any longer. The roads we drive are fairly rural and have been getting cold and icy enough in recent years to make me think. This may also have been prompted by having to park the car and walk the last twelve miles home in that last bout of snow. My wife and I both work jobs where we’re expected in regardless of conditions.

At the same time, this is our ‘second’ car and only does 5-6000 miles per year, so I’m not sure of the faff/expense of alternating summer and winter sets. I am considering buying some steels and winters for our main car for November to March use but may well go down the all-season route with that too.
 

Beemers

Über Member
MRK1 You are absolutely correct with German cars and their motorcycles. I have a BMW 335X drive twin turbo ,8 speed, 7200 rpm red line it will pull red line in all8 gears.tire wear not to be considered.
 

Chief Brody

Forum GOD!
This may be a silly question: Currently looking for new tyres, I know the sizes needed - however, is it advisable to have different weight & speed ratings? It's a family car, and will never do 148mph etc. Currently have '91w', but there are some better deals with a slightly different rating etc.

I guess the best thing is to stick to what is currently on the car?
 

p.b

Forum GOD!
My understanding is that reputable garages will not fit a non recommended tyre to your car. Just because you don’t drive at 148mph doesn’t mean the next owner won’t (or your wife or son without telling you).
 

Northam Saint

Forum GOD!
My understanding is that reputable garages will not fit a non recommended tyre to your car. Just because you don’t drive at 148mph doesn’t mean the next owner won’t (or your wife or son without telling you).
Alas too many fitters doing things they shouldn’t. A popular thing at the moment is stretching.

Tyre stretching is the practice of fitting a tyre to a wheel where the tyre is narrower than the wheel itself. The tyre sidewalls, instead of being basically 90˚ square to the tread are pulled over to the outsized rim, effectively flattening the low profile tyre at the same time.

Dangerous as it’s putting loads on it wasn’t designed for and apparently they wear extra quick.
 

chris.hale

Forum DOG!
Staff member
I've been through dunlop, continental, avon, cooper, Uniroyal, Michelin, Toyo.. And t be honest for the type of driving I do, nothing beats chinese tyres for vfm.. Evergreen are one the premium chinese tyres. Remember Nankang? Cheapo, Chinese ditch finders? These are now a Chinese premium brand...and quite expensive o boot!
Last time I was in the tyre fitters, I overheard one of the guys saying that "we will all be running Chinese tyres in the next few years ."
To that end and for the type of driving I do, I have no quarms running Chinese rubber. Currently Joyride..
Previous to this Avon and Uniroyal were the choice on my Golf GTI
When I had my MX-5 I had Toyo Proxes, a chirp from the rear end was far from uncommon during spirited driving and they lasted well under a year. Being short of cash one month but needing tyres I had Evergreens put on and they seemed to be just as good as the Proxes but lasted much longer.

I currently have Evergreens on the back end of my Freelander, I was planning to replace them with Grabber AT3's next time it needed all four corners done but the back tyres won't die. Might have to swap them onto the front next time the fronts need done and see if I can kill the buggers that way.
 

Rowlers

Massive Member
Staff member
Alas too many fitters doing things they shouldn’t. A popular thing at the moment is stretching.

Tyre stretching is the practice of fitting a tyre to a wheel where the tyre is narrower than the wheel itself. The tyre sidewalls, instead of being basically 90˚ square to the tread are pulled over to the outsized rim, effectively flattening the low profile tyre at the same time.

Dangerous as it’s putting loads on it wasn’t designed for and apparently they wear extra quick.
This has been going on for years. Loads used to do this back when I had my golf. A tiny little bit of stretch isn't going to make a massive difference, but to excessive stretch that the go for has got to be dangerous.. Not something I would do...
 
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