Tyres

MrK1

Forum GOD!
I have a first MOT coming up on an Audi A4 and I need a couple of tyres.

It currently has Dunlop's.
My usual tyre bloke has recommended Falkens.
Apparently they are just as good and £30 cheaper.

Any one got any other suggestions or recommendations of anywhere to get a good deal from?
 

Rowlers

Massive Member
Staff member
I've been through dunlop, continental, avon, cooper, Uniroyal, Michelin, Toyo.. And t be honest for the type of driving I do, nothing beats chinese tyres for vfm.. Evergreen are one the premium chinese tyres. Remember Nankang? Cheapo, Chinese ditch finders? These are now a Chinese premium brand...and quite expensive o boot!
Last time I was in the tyre fitters, I overheard one of the guys saying that "we will all be running Chinese tyres in the next few years ."
To that end and for the type of driving I do, I have no quarms running Chinese rubber. Currently Joyride..
Previous to this Avon and Uniroyal were the choice on my Golf GTI
 

Driftwood

Legendary Member
I've recently replaced the Continentals with Dunlop Sport BluResponse tyres on my Golf TDI, with no issues and have been excellent on wet roads, essential for me
 
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Batch300

Extraordinarily Uncomplicated
I always liked Michelin on my A3's. I did use summer and winter tires (snow and very cold temps) tyres. For various reasons, I like tyres
with a good balance of performance handling and wet/cold weather safety.

Several sites with reviews. Different tyres for different applications & drivers.
 

DamianJ

Forum GOD!
I've recently replaced the Continentals with Dunlop Sport BluResponse tyres on my Golf TDI, with no issues and have been excellent on wet roads, essential for me
I have had a couple of sets of these on my Seat Leon, would recommend.
 

MrK1

Forum GOD!
Just realised the tyres I currently have, have kerbside protection built in.

That is a must, so it narrows down my choices a bit.
 

p.b

Forum GOD!
And to be honest for the type of driving I do, nothing beats chinese tyres for vfm..
The problem with this statement is that tyres need to cope with the type of driving you DON'T WANT, not the type of driving you like to do, e.g. emergency stops, violent lane changes etc.

Many of the cheaper tyre brands are old designs and compounds. From my understanding Fulda is a cheaper sub-brand of Dunlop, so it's probably an old design and compound. Therefore, it wouldn't be a bad tyre but it wouldn't be the best you can buy. Those four patches of rubber, roughly, the size of the palm of your hand are the only bits connecting the 2 tonne vehicle to the road, therefore, they're the only bits allowing you to stop or change direction. If one calculates the cost of the tyres Vs. the cost of a vehicle, yearly insurance and the value of 'you' then it's not an expensive investment.
 

p.b

Forum GOD!
Just realised the tyres I currently have, have kerbside protection built in.

That is a must, so it narrows down my choices a bit.
You don't need to replace them with ones that also have kerbside protection BUT you might end up knackering your rims.
 

Rowlers

Massive Member
Staff member
The problem with this statement is that tyres need to cope with the type of driving you DON'T WANT, not the type of driving you like to do, e.g. emergency stops, violent lane changes etc.

Many of the cheaper tyre brands are old designs and compounds. From my understanding Fulda is a cheaper sub-brand of Dunlop, so it's probably an old design and compound. Therefore, it wouldn't be a bad tyre but it wouldn't be the best you can buy. Those four patches of rubber, roughly, the size of the palm of your hand are the only bits connecting the 2 tonne vehicle to the road, therefore, they're the only bits allowing you to stop or change direction. If one calculates the cost of the tyres Vs. the cost of a vehicle, yearly insurance and the value of 'you' then it's not an expensive investment.
Yeah, good point, maybe I shouldn't scrimp in tyres!:blush:
I still don't believe the hype of expensive tyres though. Continentals are terrible (generally, in my experience), both for how fast they wear and how poor the grip is in the wet...
 

MrK1

Forum GOD!
You don't need to replace them with ones that also have kerbside protection BUT you might end up knackering your rims.
I know. I would rather have the kerbside protection though.

There has been a few near misses with the kerb, apart from the visual aspect, I don't want to be hit with high damage costs when when I hand the car back next year.
 
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p.b

Forum GOD!
Yeah, good point, maybe I shouldn't scrimp in tyres!:blush:
I still don't believe the hype of expensive tyres though. Continentals are terrible (generally, in my experience), both for how fast they wear and how poor the grip is in the wet...
Tyres are a black art, and what isn't generally known is that OEM tyres are different to after market tyres. This means a Ford Focus Continental Sport Contact 2 will have a different construction and compound to the exact same size and load index VW Golf Continental Sport Contact 2 which again will be different to the Sport Contact 2 you can buy in Kiwk-Fit / ATS! The OEM tyre will be specifically tuned to the damping, geometry and desired attribute (e.g. dry grip vs rolling resistance for fuel economy) for each vehicle.

This means that unless you are buying OEM spec tyres (I understand Porsche allow you do to this) the replacement tyres WILL be different to the originals even if they have the same name. Unless you can try before you buy it's a bit of a crap-shoot so how well matched the after-market tyres are to your vehicle. That is most probably why you've not been impressed with Continentals - a mismatch to your vehicle and own personal preferences (sharp steering Vs. good ride etc).

I think you are right: buying the most expensive tyres doesn't mean you've got the best!

However, cheap tyres are a death trap and in my opinion it should be illegal to sell some tyres. Personally I stick with Premium or near-premium tyre brands and if there's a deal on them so much the better.
 

Dipesh

Forum GOD!
Staff member
I always go for Michelin on my personal cars. Not bad on price at Costco.

If not then good years.

I've had some Chinese tyres on my Passat since I bought it and they still have good tread, albeit on the back of the car after a hell of a lot of miles. Grips so so though.
 

p.b

Forum GOD!
I always go for Michelin on my personal cars. Not bad on price at Costco.

If not then good years.

I've had some Chinese tyres on my Passat since I bought it and they still have good tread, albeit on the back of the car after a hell of a lot of miles. Grips so so though.
Yeah - Michelins are probably the most consistently good tyres. Pricey, but always at a high level. If you can get a good price it's a non-brainer decision.
 

Driftwood

Legendary Member
Yeah, good point, maybe I shouldn't scrimp in tyres!:blush:
I still don't believe the hype of expensive tyres though. Continentals are terrible (generally, in my experience), both for how fast they wear and how poor the grip is in the wet...
I like Continentals, they are good all round tyre but they do wear out quick, to me they are on a par Michelin, but they last longer. So far I'm impressed with the Dunlop bluResponse, the mark of the tyre is their performance poor conditions
 
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