Taking better SOTD pictures, any tips?

Wayne

Forum Sod
I'd really like to improve my SOTd pictures and was wondering if anyone has any tips that I could use to make my pictures a little better. I do have an active imagination, I don't have expensive DSLR. lighting gear and a studio.
Thanks to all you great photographers out there for any help offered.
 
Your SOTD Pics are top notch Wayne ...I take mine with my phone, hence they are rubbish.
Maybe a camera rather than a phone works better. Some really good photographers on here mind so I reckon you'll get some good advice.
 

DamianJ

Forum GOD!
A lot of the SOTD pics that I really like try and be a bit different in the composition or are simply pleasing to my eye.

I think that there was a thread a while ago where people shared their tips for their SOTD photos.

You don't need a DSLR to capture a good photo though, although depending on what you want to do e.g. small depth of field etc a DSLR allows for greater control if you know what you're doing.
 

Wayne

Forum Sod
Your SOTD Pics are top notch Wayne ...I take mine with my phone, hence they are rubbish.
Maybe a camera rather than a phone works better. Some really good photographers on here mind so I reckon you'll get some good advice.
Thanks Chris, I too only use my phone and yours aren't rubbish mate.
 

wooky114

Legend In His Own Lunchtime
You using the built in flash or a flash attached to the camera?

If you've only got on camera flash, diffuse it, plenty of ways to make a DIY diffuser and google is your friend.

My set up is generally this for ease of use: Nikon D300, Nikon 60mm / 50mm or 28mm lens, Nikon SB800 flash, ISO 400, F11/F8 @ 50sec, flash on TTL, but facing away from the subject (helps light but diffuse the subject/picture). Take the picture, put the files on the PC, import it in Affinity Photo, develop it, tone map it, crop/straighten, export to jpeg and upload.
 

wooky114

Legend In His Own Lunchtime
On a phone, if you've 'Pro' settings, f2.8 will give you a shallow depth of field, i.e the area focused on with be sharp but anything in front or behind the focus point will be blurry and the blurry effect reduces the higher the f no. so f11 will get most everything sharp, f22 everything will be sharp.
 

wooky114

Legend In His Own Lunchtime
Have a play with the depth of field settings, take the same photo at f16, again @ f8 and again @ f2.8, find a style that works for you as you've control of the light with the light box.
 

vita

Mach 5 Turbo Fusion
Lighting is the most important thing, but it doesn't need to be expensive studio gear. Just some lights!
 

Rowlers

Massive Member
Staff member
Not sure if smart phones have adjustable apertures...? Shame.
My photos are generally crap too... However I do enjoy a play about in Snapseed. It is amazing what you can turn out from a simple point and shoot...
 

JamieM

Forum GOD!
1. Use a tripod
2. Use a remote shutter
3. fill your frame with the subject matter crop your images hard
4. try various exposures both over and underexpose your shot
5. study your composition there's no hurry take your time think about it stand back and really look
6. natural light works better for natural colours
7. don't be scared to experiment try fill in flash
8. use a reflector board to throw light on certain areas
9. focus on the part of the shot you think is the most important or interesting
10. try using your cameras custom settings such as black & white sepia tone and so on
 
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