Sourdough anyone?

Discussion in 'Recreation, Hobbies & Interests' started by halvor, Mar 1, 2019.

  1. halvor

    halvor Esquire

    Location:
    Norway
    Anyone here with experience with sourdough starters? I started one three-four days ago and all was dandy apparently, as it quickly bubbled and raised. Then suddenly it stopped yesterday, and separated with water on top. I think it may have been when I went with room temp water and white flour for the first time. It’s kept the sour scent, though, and it doesn’t appear to have fully caved, so to speak. Just poured off excess water and added some more full grain flour (50/50 rye wheat), and after 30 mins now it indeed does bubble.

    image.jpg

    Pointers, tips?
     
    Hodge likes this.
  2. Nishy

    Nishy Forum GOD! Staff Member

    Yes love sourdough! Also a big fan of rye bread. My favourite has to be Guinness and apple bread. Soda seems to harden very quickly and I prefer more of a fermented taste.

    Made a few sourdough loaves in my time, plenty of cultures been thrown away too. Hot sour dough bread with Gazpacho soup, lovely!

    Totally random but what are your thoughts on fermented shark Halvor?
     
    halvor likes this.
  3. I love sourdough bread Halvor! But the girlfriend know all about it's inner mysteries I have no clue. She bakes that one...
    I personally like to bake the simple varieties of "Loff" and "Frøbrød" which are really very easy.
     
    Hodge and halvor like this.
  4. Sid James

    Sid James ...

    Loads of experience scoffing it so if you need any help with that I’m your man. Other than that please keep us updated.
     
    Paper Plane, Fox and halvor like this.
  5. captain_hx

    captain_hx Thalassophile

    I suggest you mix 100g of flour with 100g of water in a glass jar, add 1 tablespoon from your starter and mix everything together. Hopefully the wild yeast in you starter is still alive and will start feeding on the fresh flour. Let it sit and monitor for a day, your are looking to see bubbles forming and the starter raising towards the top of the jar. A rubber band placed around the jar helps with monitoring. 24hours after they first feeding, discard most of the starter and keep one tablespoon, add 100g flour and 100g water and let it sit for another day. Keep on repeating this process for 3-5 days (may take longer if room temperature is low). You want you starter to be able to at least double in size, triple is optimal. The smell from the starter may be unpleasant during the first days but should settle down once the starter is healthy.

    Alternatively, you could start over again

    View: https://youtu.be/m6pGkOuZnrk


    Or ask your fellow citizen Elise for advice.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2019
    halvor likes this.
  6. halvor

    halvor Esquire

    Location:
    Norway
    Thanks, guys. Might just take you up on that, Steve @Sid James

    What I’d like to understand is the logic behind the phases. I’ve seen various roads all of which are said to lead to Rome, but most include an initial building up of mass, and then a second phase where one discards parts and adds new flour to get it bake ready (the measure for which is for it to raise to twice its size). What goes on with the culture during the phases and why and when to start a new?

    Here’s what it looks like now - should be alive still? I guess I’ll have to discard loads and add more flour now aiming to get it to raise again? But should I continue with whole grain or white/all purpose, and which type - have already got spelt, wheat and rye going on here? (Strikes me now that I also added a few pinches of maldon along with said first introduction of white and room temp water.)

    8D466061-3C14-42D2-A0AF-FE2825C6504C.jpeg
     
  7. captain_hx

    captain_hx Thalassophile

    Microorganisms are living inside your starter and are feeding off the flour. Once there's nothing more to eat they starve to death. To keep them alive you have to add flour and water. If you don't discard some starter you will end up with a large population of microorganisms that will need a lot of flour to be kept alive. By binning some starter at every feed you basically save on flour. When you have a healthy starter you can store it in the fridge or even in the freezer for long-term storage.
     
    halvor likes this.
  8. captain_hx

    captain_hx Thalassophile

    How does it smells like? Can you describe your process so far?

    I feed mine with a 70% hard bread flour 30% whole grain mix and 100% water.
     
  9. halvor

    halvor Esquire

    Location:
    Norway
    I’ve never before smelled a sourdough starter, and couldn’t say if it smells right, but it does smell ‘freshly sour’, akin perhaps to a sour beer, think that’s the best analogy I can come up with.
     
  10. captain_hx

    captain_hx Thalassophile

    The first smell you get when creating a sourdough culture is usually alcohol from the fermentation, sometimes you may detect cheese smell from the lactic acid which develops to a well ripe fruit smell before settling down to your own unique sourdough smell.
     
    halvor likes this.
  11. captain_hx

    captain_hx Thalassophile

    During the first days of creating your sourdough starter you stir it 3-4 times per day and keep it uncovered because you are trying to catch wild yeast from the air. This is easier done during the summer when temperatures are high.
     
    halvor likes this.
  12. halvor

    halvor Esquire

    Location:
    Norway
    Just read now that one usually sees a slowing down on day three-four, but, and I quote, “don’t give up” — suppose that might be what is going on here. I’ve now moved two scoops into a separate jar, adding ~100 grams each of water and rye/wheat, keeping both the bowl and the jar for now.
     
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  13. Hodge

    Hodge Forum GOD!

    Location:
    Canada
    I make a quick rise, no knead bread but havent been brave enough to try a sourdough starter. Im might be inclined to try it now :happy:
     
  14. captain_hx

    captain_hx Thalassophile

    How did your sourdough culture respond to yesterdays feed?
     
  15. halvor

    halvor Esquire

    Location:
    Norway
    Thanks for asking! I’ve discarded and fed now twice make that thrice, and after yesterday afternoon’s feeding, it has raised from tin foil level, nearly doubling. Must have worked, then, and it’s now bake ready?
    image.jpg
     
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