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Winter Skin Problem

Discussion in 'Grooming and Style' started by SeanC, Dec 21, 2016.

  1. SeanC

    SeanC Legendary Member

    Location:
    SE London
    For the last few years I've developed spots on my upper body during the colder months (only). Similar to acne, but weeping more and often tending to take up to a week to dry up. Prescribed treatments for both acne and folliculitis didn't make any difference, neither did Vitamin D supplements in case a deficiency in the winter was a cause.

    Purely as a shot in the dark, I changed over from shower gels to traditional bar soap this autumn. Much to my surprise, no spots at all this year. I can only guess that I have some kind of sensitivity to one of the ingredients in shower gels such as SLS, but it still doesn't entirely make sense.

    Can anybody add anything?
     
  2. UKRob

    UKRob Legendary Member

    I've had a difficult skin for as long as I can remember - and getting older has not made much of a difference. Exposure to the sun works wonders - as does the occasional visit to a tanning bed when the sun is in short supply. I really do mean occasional but it makes a big difference.
     
    SeanC likes this.
  3. Nishy

    Nishy Forum GOD! Staff Member

    Apart from conducting a blood test and assessing results, the only other issue, as you found could be a change in product or developing sensitivity to it. Vitamin D really should only be taken if the blood test suggests you are deficient.

    Best course of action would be to use as simple a product as possible and to monitor the area. This is just my own advice and in no way professional.
     
    SeanC likes this.
  4. Batch300

    Batch300 Extraordinarily Uncomplicated

    I am a frequent visitor to a Dermatologist and Allergist - not a medical professional.

    Someone like Einstein or Red Green said "If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it". Sounds like you found a low cost solution. A "seasonal reaction" to the same product does seem unusual.
     
    SeanC likes this.